Batik Table Runners

Auditioning warp colors and fabrics, this was the beginning of a series of table runners. I ended up with twelve colors in the warp, and used different coordinating batik fabrics for weft. The cotton prints in the basket were set aside for a future warp.

Since I have a horizontal countermarche loom, I make my warps in two halves, most often on the warping mill.


One runner in a series using various “wine” batiks.


Wine runners at The Studio Gallery, Summer 2008.

The Studio Gallery


Batik table runner at The Studio Gallery, coordinating nicely with pottery by Nancy Shoop.

The Studio Gallery is located behind The Outdoorsman Restaurant, in Boulder Junction, WI. In the small red building, you will find the work of eleven artists. We are a cooperative gallery, with members working a couple days a month. In the gallery, you will find the work of Carol Miller, photographer; Wendy Polalisz, watercolors and jewelry; Amy Higgason and Nancy Shoop, potters; Louise Engelbrecht, watercolors and weaving; Kathleen Kimball, handmade soap, collage artist, and book arts; Cathy Wirtz, knitted/felted hats and bags; Jane O’Brien, water-colors; Shirley Surges, watercolors; Toni Bergeon, quilt arts; and myself, with weaving and
hand-crafted socks.

It is wonderful, everytime I drive over to spend the day, to see the new artwork that has been brought in, and to hear the positive comments of visitors and buyers on the quality of the work.

Today I am at the gallery, and this evening I’ll be in Three Lakes doing a sock machine demo at an open house at their new arts center. This weekend is the area Art Tour, as well as the sale of work by the Lake Country Weavers at the UCC Church in Eagle River. All in all, a very Arty weekend.

Sock Orders to Fill

I feel as if I’ve spent a good part of my summer cranking socks, having made over 100 pairs, and selling 80 pairs so far. I had so been looking forward to getting back to my loom, after Art In The Yard. There is a warp to finish weaving, and many more to be made and woven. However, there has been a slight delay,…

Yesterday and today, I am cranking socks to fill the orders from Art In The Yard. Two more pairs to do today, close the toes, wash and hang to air dry, then finish and tag. This photo is a sock in progress on the 1908 Gearhart.

Art in the Yard

Art in the Yard was held yesterday, an annual art sale by members of the Art Gypsies, loosely comprised of a few members from the cooperative gallery I am part of, and a couple other area artists.

It was an overcast sometimes drizzly autumn day in the northwoods of WI, but attendance was good. Tents were up, art and artists were there, coffee and treats were available, and a small bonfire was kept burning throughout the day.

There was quite a bit of interest in the 1908 Gearhart sock machine that I was demonstrating on. I was pleased that of the twenty-eight pairs of socks I had there, sixteen pairs sold. I came home with orders for four more pairs of socks when people liked a particular pair, but needed a different size than what I had available yesterday.

Most people have never seen an antique circular sock knitting machine before and are fascinated with seeing one in use. I had a very enjoyable day sharing my interest, explaining how the socks are made, and answering questions. Before the day was over I was asked to do another demo at the Three Lakes Center of the Arts at their last Open House of the season. The best part of the day was people’s enjoyment of my work and the colors I use, and seeing my socks going off to keep people warm during the coming winter.

Welcome to Shuttle Works Studio

My interest in weaving began in May 1979, during a visit to “The Looms” in Mineral Point, WI, owned and run by the late Ken Colwell. The museum had a wonderful old Norwegian counter-balance barn-type loom, a Jacquard loom and a working table-size Jacquard loom. In addition, there was a large collection of spinning wheels, and an outstanding coverlet collection.

In the classroom area were several Glimakra countermarche looms, and upstairs was a loom with an opphampta attachment, a single unit drawloom, and an AVL computer-driven dobby loom. I knew I would return.

Being newly married, it took a couple years before I expressed my desire to spend a week at The Looms to attend a Beginning Weaving class, and did so in Summer 1981, followed by an Intermediate Weaving class in 1982. Before returning home, I ordered a 10 shaft Glimakra countermarche loom, which I still weave on today. Each summer for about ten years I would travel to Mineral Point and attend a weaving class, or Colloquy, an annual gathering of members of Complex Weavers. Around 1986, I brought home a used, 10 shaft Glimakra single unit drawloom. I had just started weaving on that loom, when we moved to the northwoods of WI. With three moves in five years, the drawloom has been disassembled for the past thirteen years. I am now looking forward to learning about damask and drawloom weaving.

Marriage, three children, and homeschooling were priorities over the past 21 years. While I continued to do some weaving and spinning, the strong desire to pursue my interests in fibers never left. Now that my oldest daughter is attending college, and my two teens attend high school, I am now able to pursue my weaving and other fiber interests.

In order to make my studio space accessible to visitors, we are about to move everything from a large upstairs room to the main floor of our home. This is going to be interesting.

The photo above is of a quiet moment in Shuttle Works Studio.

Studio Life of a Weaver, Spinner, Dyer